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Symposium - Digital Cities

Sem 126, Gußhausstr. 28-30, 1st Floor, Room: FB0113

This symposium seeks to continue the Digital Cities workshop series started in 1999, which is the longest running academic workshop series that has followed the intertwined development of cities, communities, and digital technologies. Digital Cities #11 aims to understand how to consider more- than-human stakeholders such as natural systems in designing cities. The symposium invites critiques of conventional approaches that tend to favour human comfort and convenience. Cities designed at the expense of nature are problematic as the health of the natural environment is linked to citizens’ wellbeing. Digital Cities #11 gathers contributions towards new design methods for the co-creation of digital technology and urban informatics that take into account how the sustenance and prosperity of humans and non-humans are interdependent with nature. It contributes fundamental and theoretically grounded research to achieving UN Sustainable Development Goal 11 – Sustainable Cities & Communities.

Saturday 1 June 2019

People

Organisers

  • Marcus Foth - QUT Design Lab Queensland University of Technology Brisbane QLD Australia
  • Martin Tomitsch Design - LabThe University of Sydney Sydney NSW Australia
  • Sara Heitlinger Department of Computer Science City, University of London London, UK
  • Rachel Clarke Northumbria School of Design Northumbria University Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

Participants

Panel 1 – Participation

  • Aldo de Moor
  • Peter Lyle
  • Sophie McDonald
  • Irina Paraschivoiu
  • Annika Wolff

Panel 2 – Technology, Data & AI

  • Petra Biro
  • Aale Luusua
  • Santiago Sanchez Guzman
  • Mirko Schaefer
  • Laryssa Tarachucky

Panel 3 – Nature and the City

  • Martijn de Waal
  • Clara Mancini
  • Ingrid Mulder
  • Anton Poikolainen Rosén
  • Gianluca Schiavo

Tuesday 4 June 2019

Activities

Panel members are set up at the front, introducing themselves

Start of the first panel on Participation

Panel 2: Technology, Data and AI

Panel 2: Technology, Data and AI

*Updating the post-it notes

Two of the groups went to enjoy the sun in the backyard while discussing their tasks

Two of the groups went to enjoy the sun in the backyard while discussing their tasks

Two of the groups went to enjoy the sun in the backyard while discussing their tasks

Two of the groups went to enjoy the sun in the backyard while discussing their tasks

Final presentations back to the groups

Final presentations back to the groups

the 3 groups presented their ideas for chapter outlines for a book "more than human smart cities"

the 3 groups presented their ideas for chapter outlines for a book "more than human smart cities"

the 3 groups presented their ideas for chapter outlines for a book "more than human smart cities"

the 3 groups presented their ideas for chapter outlines for a book "more than human smart cities"

the 3 groups presented their ideas for chapter outlines for a book "more than human smart cities"

the 3 groups presented their ideas for chapter outlines for a book "more than human smart cities"

the 3 groups presented their ideas for chapter outlines for a book "more than human smart cities"

the 3 groups presented their ideas for chapter outlines for a book "more than human smart cities"

Tuesday 4 June 2019

Outcomes

the 3 groups presented their ideas for chapter outlines for a book "more than human smart cities"

Group 1:

two main parts: 1) define clearly what is "more than human" and what are associated values, what are smart city topics and themes, setting scene, introduction, what is already there, methodologies like story telling, participatory design, mapping, sense making etc 2) scaling along these paradoxes, platforms and methodologies, how do we combine the two "more than humans" and "smart cities", thinking beyond, expand context e.g. how to scale up participation

Group 2:

Address in introduction: there is no business model for the work of making modern cities for communities what would be financial incentives etc

4 main questions to address in chapters: 1) Which are the methods and indicators that help articulate top-down and bottom-up initiatives?

2) What are the dynamics of power and counter power in more-than-human cities participation processes?

3) If we are looking for the most more-than-human city, what would be the qualities we should look for?

4) How is considering other elements affecting our sense of citizenship?

Group 3:

chapter 1: applications raise awareness and thereby empathy for example for bats, spiders or other animals that don't receive as much compassion and interest otherwise for example by using language to rephrase them. examine a number of examples that tell us how existing projects have approached the topic in terms of design, methods, ethics and highlight what was missing, what needs to be done or could be improved

chapter 2: symbiotics of engagement, we don't have the same sensors as non human actors how can we use technology and infrastructure to enhance our own capabilities to enhance the individual understanding of the environment better


Finally, the different interpretations of the term "more than human" was discussed:

  • technical, non-biological, AI, sensors, computers etc vs.
  • biological, environmental, animals, for sustainability agenda (--> focus on this perspective in the symposium)

how do these two things sit together? ethics, important to set the frame / scene to be able to create an elaborate approach to combine the different lenses, how could these two support each other?

Tuesday 4 June 2019